Skip to main content

Young farmers, ranchers win district awards


Young farmers and ranchers are cultivating a bright future for Texas agriculture.

This year’s Outstanding Young Farmer & Rancher (YF&R) contest highlighted many producers from across the state.

The competition recognizes the accomplishments of some of the state’s stop agricultural leaders between the ages of 18 and 35 and rewards them for their hard work, dedication and determination.

Winners were selected from each of TFB’s 13 districts. They include:

District 1: Jesse and Karri Wieners
Jesse and Karri grow wheat, grain sorghum, alfalfa, cotton, vegetables and wine grapes. They custom harvest and custom farm, as well as grow flowers for seed production in Carson County. The couple has four children.

District 2: Alton and Adrienne Synatschk
Alton grows corn, cotton, grain sorghum and wheat with his wife, Adrienne, in Lamb County. They raise cow-calf pairs and stockers. The couple also runs a custom spraying business. The Synatchks have four children.

District 3: James and Lindsay Mitchell
James and Lindsay grow wheat, cotton and corn, as well as commercial seed, in Archer County. Lindsay also partners on a dairy farm with her father. In addition, the couple has a cow-calf and stocker operation. The Mitchells have two children.

District 4: Cote and Ashley Sutton
Cote grows wheat and corn and runs a small cow-calf operation with his wife, Ashley, in Grayson County. They also manage a custom harvesting operation and have harvested wheat from Texas to Colorado. The couple has three children.

District 5: Patrick and Lacey Williams
Patrick and Lacey have a commercial hay operation in Smith County. By maximizing yield and nutritional content, the couple produces hay for equine and cattle. They also operate Spray and Fertilize LLC—a joint venture with their family.

District 6: Slayton and Abby Hoelscher
Slayton and Abby grow irrigated cotton, corn, wheat and peanuts in Tom Green County. Slayton started the operation from a small garden and greenhouse. They are now converting their farm from conventional tillage to minimal and no-till practices.

District 8: Travis and Kaylin Isbell
Travis raises commercial cattle and a smaller herd of dorper sheep with his wife, Kaylin, in Williamson County. They also grow Sudan and grass hay, as well as winter oats. Travis also manages two local ranches. The couple has two children.

District 9: Braden and Jordan McInnis
Braden and Jordan grow corn, wheat, cotton, soybeans, grain sorghum, oats and hay in Anderson County. They sell their corn directly to local poultry growers. The first generation farmers also raise Angus and Charolais cattle. State Finalist

District 10: Robin and Misty Giles
Robin and Misty raise registered Angus cattle, fine wool sheep, Angora goats and white-tailed deer in Kendall County. The couple manages the 130-year-old farm, ranch and agritourism operation with Robin’s parents. The couple has two kids.

District 11: Dillon and Kori Berglund
Dillon grows rice and corn in Wharton County with his wife Kori. They help develop habitat for migratory birds and use government programs to effectively shape the land they rent to enhance the drainage for the most efficient water usage.

District 12: Matt and Jessica Hanslik
Matt and Jessica have a commercial cow-calf operation and raise purebred Charolais cattle. They are also part owners of an all-natural fertilizer company, and they grow corn and hay. The couple has two children.

There were no entries for Districts 7 and 13.

For more information about the contest and other opportunities for young farmers and ranchers, visit www.texasfarmbureau.org/YFR.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

First confirmed case of COVID-19 in Canyon

The Amarillo Area Public Health has confirmed 1 case of coronavirus (COVID-19) in Canyon.

"Due to sensitive information we are not able to share details regarding this case," the city said in a statement.

On Monday, Canyon Mayor Gary Hinders hosted a Facebook Live giving details of Canyon’s response to COVID-19 Status Level Red, which is aligned with the City of Amarillo and new Amarillo Public Health guidance.

Effective immediately, Amarillo Public Health has updated its coronavirus (COVID-19) Level to RED. This is the highest alert level, indicating there are widespread confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Amarillo and the surrounding area.

Hinders issued stay at home guidelines, that went into effect tonight, (March 30) at 11:59 pm and will be in place at least through Monday, April 13, 2020.

"We ask that residents stay at home except for outings essential to their own health, safety, and welfare and that of their family members," the city said.

Under these guideline…

Grocery stores impacted by COVID-19 outbreak

With the continued spread of COVID-19, many grocery stores throughout the area have been facing changes in operations as well as economic impacts.

Nancy Sharp, manager of communications and community engagement for the United “family,” which includes all Llano Logistics, RC Taylor, United Express, Amigos, Market Street and United Supermarkets, said COVID-19 has many people doing some fear-driven, panic-type buying, causing a significant increase in traffic in stores and people purchasing items.

The closure of dining establishments has also impacted sales as more people are cooking at home, which Sharp said has provided an increase to grocery stores across the country. The increase in traffic has also increased the amount of people who are working in the stores and the need for additional cleaning.

“We are cleaning multiple times a day, multiple surfaces. And so that has definitely increased the number,” Sharp said. “We're restocking several times a day; that also has increased th…

White House projects between 100,000 and 240,000 American deaths from coronavirus

President Trump's top health advisers said Tuesday that models show between 100,000 and 240,000 Americans could die from the novel coronavirus even if the country keeps stringent social distancing guidelines in place.

Without any measures to mitigate the disease's spread, those projections jump to between 1.5 and 2.2 million deaths from COVID-19.

The models, which were displayed at a White House press briefing Tuesday, underpinned Trump's decision to extend social distancing guidelines to the end of April.

Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus task force coordinator, explained the data, urging the public to steel for difficult weeks ahead while expressing hope that the efforts would reduce the spread of the coronavirus. 

“There’s no magic bullet, there’s no magic vaccine or therapy. It’s just behaviors,” Birx said, adding that it would be those behaviors that could change “the course of the viral pandemic.”

Second COVID-19 case confirmed in Canyon

The Amarillo Area Public Health has confirmed a second positive case of coronavirus (COVID-19) in Canyon. Due to sensitive information the City of Canyon is not provided details on any cases.

Last week, Mayor Gary Hinders hosted a Facebook Live giving details of Canyon’s response to COVID-19 Status Level Red, which is aligned with the City of Amarillo and new Amarillo Public Health guidance.

Effective immediately, Amarillo Public Health has updated its coronavirus (COVID-19) Level to RED. This is the highest alert level, indicating there are widespread confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Amarillo and the surrounding area.

Hinders issued stay at home guidelines, that went into effect March 30 at 11:59 pm and will be in place at least through Monday, April 13, 2020.

"We ask that residents stay at home except for outings essential to their own health, safety, and welfare and that of their family members," the city said.

Under these guidelines, all businesses, except those essenti…

First COVID-19 death in Lubbock: City confirms 10 additional cases

The City of Lubbock confirmed its first COVID-19 related death in a news release on Saturday. The individual was a male in his 60s who had underlying health conditions and was a resident of Lubbock, according to the release.

As of 5 p.m. on Saturday, the City of Lubbock has confirmed 10 additional cases of COVID-19, bringing the total number of cases in Lubbock County to 41, according to the release.

The Texas Department of State Health Services has reported additional cases of COVID-19 in the surrounding areas to Lubbock County, including seven in Hockley County, one in Terry County, one in Gaines County, one in Hale County and one in Yoakum County, according to the release.

The City of Lubbock Health Department will continue monitoring individuals to reduce the risk of the transmission of COVID-19, according to the release.