Skip to main content

GOP lawmakers speak out against 'send her back' chants

House Republicans are speaking out against the “send her back” chant that erupted at President Trump's rally Wednesday night against progressive Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.).

A number of GOP lawmakers said they were not comfortable with the rhetoric, and Republican leadership in the lower chamber said they discussed their concerns during a breakfast meeting with Vice President Pence on Thursday morning.


House Republican Conference Vice Chairman Mark Walker (R-N.C.) maintained there was a difference between the chant and the “Lock her up” calls against Hillary Clinton at rallies during the 2016 cycle, but said he wants to ensure that “send them back” does not become the narrative for the GOP during the 2020 cycle.

“I'm offended by ‘send her back’ or ‘send them back’ — they are American citizens. That's not what the president, I believe his intentions,” Walker, who was at the Trump rally in North Carolina the previous night, told reporters on Thursday.

“But I can't sit here as a former pastor who's worked in refugee camps, who cherishes the wonderful minority communities that are that have supported us and continue to support us without saying, 'That's offensive.'"

“It's not the right way for Americans to talk to other Americans, period,” he said.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) said the chants “have no place in this country” but also told reporters he believes early criticism over the president’s response to the chants during the rally were unwarranted.

“He talked about the love of this country and said if you don't love this country you can leave — that a fundamental difference. That's what the president is talking about,” McCarthy said at a press conference.

“This is an issue about ideology. This is an issue that when you talk about one of these individuals, who introduced a bill, introduced to support of boycott, divestiture, and sanctions against Israel ... in this bill that she introduced it even talks about the boycott when it came to Nazis in Germany. This is the differences that we have, this is what this debate and fight is about."

House Republicans weighed in shortly before Trump distanced himself from the "send her back" chant from his supporters, telling reporters early Thursday afternoon he disagreed with the audience reaction when he mentioned Omar during the rally.

“I was not happy with it,” Trump told reporters at the White House. “I disagree with it.”

The chant came following days of controversy over Trump's initial tweets attacking Omar and Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.), Rashida Tlaib (Mich.) and Ayanna Pressley (Mass.), four minority Democratic congresswomen who entered office earlier this year.

Trump told the lawmakers to "go back" where they came from, comments widely panned by Democrats and some Republicans as racist.

All four of the lawmakers are U.S. citizens and each was born in the U.S. with the exception of Omar, who came to the United States after being a refugee in Somalia.

“With all due respect, everybody in that chamber came from someplace else unless they were 100 percent Native American – maybe there was an Eastern Band, you know, Cherokee there since it was North Carolina – and that's where they're at. But other than that person, everybody's from someplace else. So why would you ever use an epithet like that?” Walker said Thursday.

The GOP lawmaker told reporters that around a third of the crowd participated in the chant at the rally Wednesday night, but noted that Trump didn’t “throw gasoline on it.”

“I just think it's something that we want to address early before that comes ... even if it's a small percentage, because there's so much good to talk about our policies," he said.

"Let's focus on what's been said and the actions of Rep. Omar or others as opposed to some kind of chant that, in my opinion, is unpatriotic,” he said.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

First confirmed case of COVID-19 in Canyon

The Amarillo Area Public Health has confirmed 1 case of coronavirus (COVID-19) in Canyon.

"Due to sensitive information we are not able to share details regarding this case," the city said in a statement.

On Monday, Canyon Mayor Gary Hinders hosted a Facebook Live giving details of Canyon’s response to COVID-19 Status Level Red, which is aligned with the City of Amarillo and new Amarillo Public Health guidance.

Effective immediately, Amarillo Public Health has updated its coronavirus (COVID-19) Level to RED. This is the highest alert level, indicating there are widespread confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Amarillo and the surrounding area.

Hinders issued stay at home guidelines, that went into effect tonight, (March 30) at 11:59 pm and will be in place at least through Monday, April 13, 2020.

"We ask that residents stay at home except for outings essential to their own health, safety, and welfare and that of their family members," the city said.

Under these guideline…

Grocery stores impacted by COVID-19 outbreak

With the continued spread of COVID-19, many grocery stores throughout the area have been facing changes in operations as well as economic impacts.

Nancy Sharp, manager of communications and community engagement for the United “family,” which includes all Llano Logistics, RC Taylor, United Express, Amigos, Market Street and United Supermarkets, said COVID-19 has many people doing some fear-driven, panic-type buying, causing a significant increase in traffic in stores and people purchasing items.

The closure of dining establishments has also impacted sales as more people are cooking at home, which Sharp said has provided an increase to grocery stores across the country. The increase in traffic has also increased the amount of people who are working in the stores and the need for additional cleaning.

“We are cleaning multiple times a day, multiple surfaces. And so that has definitely increased the number,” Sharp said. “We're restocking several times a day; that also has increased th…

White House projects between 100,000 and 240,000 American deaths from coronavirus

President Trump's top health advisers said Tuesday that models show between 100,000 and 240,000 Americans could die from the novel coronavirus even if the country keeps stringent social distancing guidelines in place.

Without any measures to mitigate the disease's spread, those projections jump to between 1.5 and 2.2 million deaths from COVID-19.

The models, which were displayed at a White House press briefing Tuesday, underpinned Trump's decision to extend social distancing guidelines to the end of April.

Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus task force coordinator, explained the data, urging the public to steel for difficult weeks ahead while expressing hope that the efforts would reduce the spread of the coronavirus. 

“There’s no magic bullet, there’s no magic vaccine or therapy. It’s just behaviors,” Birx said, adding that it would be those behaviors that could change “the course of the viral pandemic.”

Second COVID-19 case confirmed in Canyon

The Amarillo Area Public Health has confirmed a second positive case of coronavirus (COVID-19) in Canyon. Due to sensitive information the City of Canyon is not provided details on any cases.

Last week, Mayor Gary Hinders hosted a Facebook Live giving details of Canyon’s response to COVID-19 Status Level Red, which is aligned with the City of Amarillo and new Amarillo Public Health guidance.

Effective immediately, Amarillo Public Health has updated its coronavirus (COVID-19) Level to RED. This is the highest alert level, indicating there are widespread confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Amarillo and the surrounding area.

Hinders issued stay at home guidelines, that went into effect March 30 at 11:59 pm and will be in place at least through Monday, April 13, 2020.

"We ask that residents stay at home except for outings essential to their own health, safety, and welfare and that of their family members," the city said.

Under these guidelines, all businesses, except those essenti…

First COVID-19 death in Lubbock: City confirms 10 additional cases

The City of Lubbock confirmed its first COVID-19 related death in a news release on Saturday. The individual was a male in his 60s who had underlying health conditions and was a resident of Lubbock, according to the release.

As of 5 p.m. on Saturday, the City of Lubbock has confirmed 10 additional cases of COVID-19, bringing the total number of cases in Lubbock County to 41, according to the release.

The Texas Department of State Health Services has reported additional cases of COVID-19 in the surrounding areas to Lubbock County, including seven in Hockley County, one in Terry County, one in Gaines County, one in Hale County and one in Yoakum County, according to the release.

The City of Lubbock Health Department will continue monitoring individuals to reduce the risk of the transmission of COVID-19, according to the release.