Senators Cruz, Johnson, Lee, and Paul oppose GOP health bill

U.S. Senators Ted Cruz (R-Texas), Ron Johnson (R-Wis.), Mike Lee (R-Utah), and Rand Paul (R-Ky.) announced on Thursday that they currently oppose the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017.

"Currently, for a variety of reasons, we are not ready to vote for this bill, but we are open to negotiation and obtaining more information before it is brought to the floor. There are provisions in this draft that represent an improvement to our current healthcare system but it does not appear this draft as written will accomplish the most important promise that we made to Americans: to repeal Obamacare and lower their healthcare costs," the Senators said in a joint statement.

Cruz said the bill would not do enough to lower the cost of insurance premiums.

"I am encouraged that the bill would expand association health plans, so those in individual or small group markets can join together in large groups to get lower rates. I am also pleased that the bill would make at least some progress in reining in the long-term growth of Medicaid. These are two inclusions that I have been fighting for since the beginning of our discussions. Finally, I am glad that this retains the provisions previously passed by Congress to prevent taxpayer dollars from funding organizations that perform abortions.


"However, as currently drafted, this bill draft does not do nearly enough to lower premiums. That should be the central issue for Republicans - repealing Obamacare and making healthcare more affordable. Because of this, I cannot support it as currently drafted, and I do not believe it has the votes to pass the Senate.

"But it is important to remember that what was released today was only a draft. I am hopeful that as we openly debate this legislation, real improvements will be made prior to floor consideration so that we can pass a bill that provides the relief from Obamacare that Republicans have repeatedly promised the last seven years," Cruz said.

Paul noted that the proposed legislation would not actually repeal Obamacare.

"The current bill does not repeal Obamacare. It does not keep our promises to the American people. I will oppose it coming to the floor in its current form, but I remain open to negotiations," Paul said.

No comments:

Powered by Blogger.